The Incline Bench Press is a version of the traditional Bench Press in which the bench is fixed at about a 45-degree angle. The resulting inclined position focuses your upper chest and the front side of your shoulders more the the quality and efficient flat bench.

In this article, I am going to demystify everything you need to know about the Incline Bench Press to assist you build a stronger and bigger upper body.

The Incline Bench Press Form

To practice an Incline Bench Press, you need some type of incline bench. Here are your three options:

A) Many gyms have an incline bench station fashioned for the exercise. This is your best choice.

B) If that’s not accessible, you’ll need to find an amendable bench, lift it to about a 45-degree angle and position it in a power/squat rack.

Lastly, you can stack a minimum of four plates on the ground and place one end of a flat utility bench on it to propel a slight incline.

For the second two options, ensure you test your setup with an empty barbell before adding weight to be sure the bench, height of the bar and safety pins are in the correct position.

Step 1: Lie on the incline bench and place your feet on the floor with your butt about 6 inches above the seat. Now move yourself down so your butt is on the seat without raising your feet off the ground. Zip firmly your glutes and core. Learn more about this setup here.

Step 2: Grasp the barbell with a grip slightly wider than shoulder width and grab onto it as clingy as you can. Unrack the bar and put it directly over your shoulders with your arms straight. This is your beginning position.

Step 4: Drive your feet into the ground and explosively place the bar up to bring back to the beginning position.

The Incline Bench Press Advantages

The Incline Bench Press is a joint upper-body exercise, meaning that multiple joints and muscles add to the movement. As a variation of the traditional flat Bench Press, it’s regarded as one of the best exercises to build a stronger and larger upper body.

The Incline Bench Press focuses on many of the same large upper-body muscles as the flat version. However, the angle of the press moves the work to your upper chest and shoulders. Your shoulders move on to take more of the work as the angle of the bench enhances  until the bench is vertical and it becomes a shoulder press.

The exercise can be practiced with heavy weight to build max strength or with light weight to enhance power or size conditioning on your goal. The inclined position is more harder to press from, so you won’t be able to raise as much weight as you can on the flat bench. Many inexperienced lifters have a penchant to prevent the Incline Bench Press for this reason. However, training your weak points with the Incline Bench Press is one of the simplest ways to build a stronger flat Bench Press and a more well-rounded upper body.

Incline Bench Press Muscles Worked

The Incline Bench Press muscles worked majorly works the clavicular head of the pectoralis major, or the upper portion of your chest. It also serves as the anterior deltoid (front portion of the shoulder) and the triceps (backside of your arm). When exemplified correctly, it should be a full-body movement utilizing the small muscles in your shoulders, large muscles in your back, your core and even your glutes.

Incline Bench Press Mistakes

Lowering the Bar Toward your Stomach

The bar path on the Bench Press moves from over your shoulders to just under your chest. However, this brings problems on the Incline Bench Press because of the angle of the lift. If you lower the bar toward your stomach, your upper arms will angle move straightly and the bar will want to fall forward out of your hands. My biceps were working hard to maintain the bar from falling just demoing this mistake.

Flaring Your Arms

Many people actually experience shoulder pain on the Incline Press. Your first place to check is your elbow placement. Do your arms flare out to the sides? If so, you’re placing your shoulders under a ton of stress and you’re not in an optimal placement to produce strength. Instead, ensure your elbows are at approximately a 45-degree angle with your body—the exact angle conditions on your anatomy.

Moving the bar off your chest

This is no answer with every Bench Press variation. It’s OK to touch the bar to your chest, but don’t move it. That’s corrupt and it’s very bad especially as you start to lift heavy weight. If you have to ball, then you definitely need to use a lighter weight.

Fighting through shoulder pain. No exact point should you be willing to fight through shoulder pain on this exercise. If you find that your shoulder hurts, first try adjusting the mistakes above and make sure you’re setting your shoulders by pulling them down and back. If this doesn’t work, then lower the incline of the bench until you find a pressing placement that’s convenient.

There are other form mistakes that actually apply to every Bench Press variation, which you can try to know more about here.

Incline Bench Press Alternatives and Variations

There are two variations of this exercise that will give a slightly different challenge for your upper body.

Incline Dumbbell Press

The Incline Dumbbell Press can be regarded as the most obvious variation. Performing this exercise with dumbbells assists improve shoulder steadiness and balances out strength between your left and right side. You won’t be able to raise as much weight, but it’s also a bit easier on your shoulders because your hands aren’t placed on a straight barbell.

Single-Arm Landmine Press

This exercise is perfect and great for anyone who experiences shoulder pain on the exercise or who is an overhead athlete, such as a baseball player or tennis player. The exercise permits for your shoulder blades to move through a full range of motion for pain-free upper-body training.

Incline Hex Press

Squeeze carefully heavy weights together as hard as you can while pressing to discover a massive chest pump and build your pecs.

Outside of those three exercises, variation largely conditions on how you approach the exercise. Here are a few examples:

A) Substitute the tempo of the lift by lowering for 3-5 seconds and exploding up.

B) Utilize about 50 percent of your max and practice the reps as explosively as possible.

C) Add bands or chains for getting resistance.

Incline Bench Press Workouts

Here are a few workout options that Showcase Lateral Raises:

Incline Bench Press Strength Workout

A) Incline Bench Press – 5×4

Incline Bench Press Superset Workout

Practice the exercises back-to-back with no relaxation between the moves.

  i.  Incline Bench Press – 4×8

 ii. Pull-Ups – 4×8

Incline Bench Press Complete-Body Circuit

Practice these exercises one after the other in a circuit without relaxing between them.

iii.  Incline Bench Press – 3×12

 iv. Dumbbell Reverse Lunge – 3×12 each leg

v. Band Pull-Aparts – 3×20

vi. TRX/Swiss Ball Hamstring Curl – 3×2.

How to Do the Decline Bench Press

The decline bench press is a very good exercise for strengthening your lower chest muscles. It’s a variation of the flat bench press, a notable chest workout.

In a decline bench press, the bench is fix to 15 to 30 degrees on a decline. This angle positions your upper body on a downward slope, which makes the lower pectoral muscles as you push weights away from your body.

When part of a complete chest routine, decline bench presses can assist your pecs look more defined.

Muscles and Benefits

The pectoralis major muscle is positioned in your upper chest. It contains of the clavicular head (upper pec) and sternal head (lower pec).

The importance of the decline bench press is to work the lower pecs.

In conjunction to lower pecs, this exercise also uses the:

A) triceps brachii in the back side of your upper arm

B) biceps brachii on the front side of your upper arm

C) anterior deltoid in the front of your shoulder

During the upward phase of a decline bench press, the lower pecs make it possible to extend the arm. It’s helped by the triceps and anterior deltoid.

In the downward phase when you put the weights back toward you, the lower pecs and anterior deltoid work to flex the arm. The biceps brachii assists this movement to a lesser extent.

Compared to other types of bench presses, the decline version is actually less stressful on the back and shoulders. That’s because the decline angle moves the stress to your lower pecs, which makes them to work harder.

Tips on Doing It:

Work with a spotter:

It’s very good to do this exercise with a spotter.

A spotter can assist you safely move the weight up and down. Plus, if you feel pain or inconvenient, they can lend a hand.

Check how far apart your hands are

Be careful of your grip. A wide grip can strain the shoulder and pecs, enhancing the risk of injury.

If you’d like to do a wide-grip bench press, prevent lowering the weight all the way to your chest. Instead, stop 3 to 4 inches above your chest to assist keep your shoulders stable.

A narrow grip is actually less stressful on the shoulders. However, it may be inconvenient if you have shoulder, wrist, or elbow problems.

A personal trainer can prescribe the best grip width for your body.

Potential cons and considerations

During a decline bench press, your torso and head are positioned at a downward slope from the rest of your body and the weight you’re holding. This angle may feel embarrassing for some people.

Gravity also brings the weight downward. This can actually make the move more challenging.

If you’re new to bench presses, you may need to try with incline or flat bench presses first.

How-to:

Before beginning this exercise, fix the bench to 15 to 30 degrees on a decline, then:

1. Maintain your feet at the end of the bench. Lie down with your eyes under the barbell.

2. Grab the bar with your palms focusing forward, arms slightly wider than shoulder-width apart.

3. Straighten your arms to raise the barbell from the rack. Move it over your shoulders, sealing your elbows.

4. Breath out and slowly lower the barbell until it reaches your mid-chest, maintain your elbows 45 degrees from your body. Pause.

5. Exhale and raise the barbell to beginning position, sealing your elbows. Pause.

6. Finish 12 repetitions. Return the barbell to the rack.

7. Ensure you repeat 3 to 5 sets total.

Due to the angle, it’s very good to begin with lighter weights. You can enhance the weight as you get used to the downward slope.

Barbell or dumbbell

The decline bench press can be completed with a barbell or dumbbells.

Each weight moves your muscles in different ways, so it’s very essential to know the difference.

A barbell helps you raise more weight. This is because your muscles don’t need to stabilize maintain the weight even.

Compared to dumbbell bench presses, barbell bench presses brings about greater activity in the triceps.

On the other hand, individual dumbbells assist you rotate your wrists. This enhances activation in different muscles, which permits for more variety.

For example, leading with your thumbs during the upward phase enhances pec activity. If you lead with your pinkies, your triceps will also connect.

In conjunction to barbell bench presses, the dumbbell version ensures more activity in the pecs and biceps.

The best option conditions on your comfort level and goals.

Tips on Doing It:

Work with a spotter:

It’s very good to do this exercise with a spotter.

A spotter can assist you safely move the weight up and down. Plus, if you feel pain or inconvenient, they can lend a hand.

Check how far apart your hands are

Be careful of your grip. A wide grip can strain the shoulder and pecs, enhancing the risk of injury.

If you’d like to do a wide-grip bench press, prevent lowering the weight all the way to your chest. Instead, stop 3 to 4 inches above your chest to assist keep your shoulders stable.

A narrow grip is actually less stressful on the shoulders. However, it may be inconvenient if you have shoulder, wrist, or elbow problems.

A personal trainer can prescribe the best grip width for your body.

Potential cons and considerations

During a decline bench press, your torso and head are positioned at a downward slope from the rest of your body and the weight you’re holding. This angle may feel embarrassing for some people.

Gravity also brings the weight downward. This can actually make the move more challenging.

If you’re new to bench presses, you may need to try with incline or flat bench presses first.

How-to:

Before beginning this exercise, fix the bench to 15 to 30 degrees on a decline, then:

1. Maintain your feet at the end of the bench. Lie down with your eyes under the barbell.

2. Grab the bar with your palms focusing forward, arms slightly wider than shoulder-width apart.

3. Straighten your arms to raise the barbell from the rack. Move it over your shoulders, sealing your elbows.

4. Breath out and slowly lower the barbell until it reaches your mid-chest, maintain your elbows 45 degrees from your body. Pause.

5. Exhale and raise the barbell to beginning position, sealing your elbows. Pause.

6. Finish 12 repetitions. Return the barbell to the rack.

7. Ensure you repeat 3 to 5 sets total.

Due to the angle, it’s very good to begin with lighter weights. You can enhance the weight as you get used to the downward slope.

Barbell or dumbbell

The decline bench press can be completed with a barbell or dumbbells.

Each weight moves your muscles in different ways, so it’s very essential to know the difference.

A barbell helps you raise more weight. This is because your muscles don’t need to stabilize maintain the weight even.

Compared to dumbbell bench presses, barbell bench presses brings about greater activity in the triceps.

On the other hand, individual dumbbells assist you rotate your wrists. This enhances activation in different muscles, which permits for more variety.

For example, leading with your thumbs during the upward phase enhances pec activity. If you lead with your pinkies, your triceps will also connect.

In conjunction to barbell bench presses, the dumbbell version ensures more activity in the pecs and biceps.

The best option conditions on your comfort level and goals.

Incline vs. Flat Bench: What’s Actually Best for Your Chest?

Incline vs. flat

Whether you’re swimming, pushing a grocery cart, or throwing a ball, having strong chest muscles is very good for everyday activities.

It’s extremely essential to train your chest muscles just as you would any other muscle group. One of the most notable and efficient exercises for making your chest muscles is the chest press. But which chest press is the most efficient: the incline or the flat bench chest press?

There’s actually no right or wrong answer. It’s more a matter of choice, what your personal goals are, and what you’re aiming to achieve. To maximize your results, do both kinds of chest presses, since they both work almost all the same muscles but hit the muscle in slightly separate ways.

Let’s view each of these options.

The table below proves that both incline bench presses and flat bench chest presses work an array of chest muscles.

Muscle Incline chest press Flat bench chest press

Pectoralis major yes yes

Anterior deltoid yes yes

Triceps brachii yes yes

Behind position. Seal your arms, hold, and come down slowly.

5. Repeat it 12 times  and then position the bar back on the rack.

6. Finish a total of five sets, joining weight after each set.

 HERE OOO

Flat Bench Presses

As mentioned, the pectoralis major contains the upper and lower pec. When flat benching, both heads are stressed evenly, which makes this exercise great for overall pec development.

The flat bench press is a much more natural fluid movement, in comparison to your everyday activities. However, same like the incline chest press, there are some cons.

Dorian Yates, a professional bodybuilder, said: “I don’t even include flat benching in my pec routine because I think it makes the front deltoids far too much to be an efficient exercise for building the chest. Also, the angle of the flat bench press places the pec tendons in a vulnerable position. Most shoulder injuries and overuse injuries can be stirred from flat benching. Many torn pecs in bodybuilding have actually been the result of heavy flat bench presses.”

As a personal trainer, I see shoulder injuries among men as the most notable injuries. Common mistakes are:

A) not having anyone to spot them correctly

B) not having assistance to rerack the bar

C) uneven grip

D) having a more controlling side lifting most of the weight, actually means they were probably at a tilt.

As with any kind of press, you really need to warm up your chest and shoulders correctly by utilizing resistance bands and by stretching. With flat benching, you need to make sure you have full shoulder organization and scapular stability to reduce the potential for injury.

If you find discomfort at all during the flat bench exercise, you should actually consider the incline bench exercise or use dumbbells instead.

Ultimately, it’s a case of preference and what your goals are. The flat bench press does a great job of developing your pecs.

Many trainers actually agree that the incline press is safer on your pecs, shoulders, and rotator cuffs. With so many exercises to consolidate your chest, the chest press with either bench will be efficient.

Here are some pointers to make sure you’re exemplifying each exercise properly.

Flat bench chest press, step by step

1. Lie down on the flat bench so that your neck and head are assisted. Your knees should be at a 90-degree angle with your feet flat on the floor. If your back gets off the bench, you might definitely consider putting your feet on the bench instead of the floor. Place yourself underneath the bar so that the bar is in line with your chest. Position your hands slightly wider than your shoulders, with your elbows flexed at a 90-degree angle. Grab the bar, palms concentrating away from you, with your fingers wrapped around it.

2. Breath out, squeeze your core, and push the barbell off the rack and up toward the ceiling utilizing your pectoral muscles. Straighten your arms out in the agreed position, and squeeze your chest.

3.  Breath in and bring the barbell down gently to your chest, again about an inch away. It should take you twice as long to bring the barbell down as it does to propel it up.

4. Explode back up to your beginning position using your pectoral muscles. Do 12 repetitions and then add more weight for your next set.

5. Exemplify five sets.

Safety precaution

If you’re utilizing dumbbells, it’s essential that you don’t drop the dumbbells down to your side when you’re done utilizing them. This is detrimental to your rotator cuff and to people around you.

If you don’t have a spotter to take the weights away, relax the dumbbells on your chest and do a crunch to raise yourself up to a seated position. To put simply, the  lower the dumbbells to your thighs, the lower it goes down to the floor.

If you’re new at this exercise, please use a spotter. If no spotter is accessible, then be cautious with the amount of weight you use.

. This is detrimental to your rotator cuff and to people around you.

If you don’t have a spotter to take the weights away, relax the dumbbells on your chest and do a crunch to raise yourself up to a seated position. To put simply, the  lower the dumbbells to your thighs, the lower it goes down to the floor.

If you’re new at this exercise, please use a spotter. If no spotter is accessible, then be cautious with the amount of weight you use.

Incline Bench Press Machine

How To Perform Exercise

The machine incline bench press is an exercise that concentrates upon the upper portion of the pectoral muscles and is preferred by most people as it gives more stability for people new to the exercise.

Steps :

1.) Start off by amending the seat of the bench so that the handles are connected with the upper portion of your chest, maintaining your back flat on the back padding and grabbing the handles with an overhand grip, as this will be your beginning position.

2.) Slowly press the handles forward until your hands are completely extended and you feel a stretch in your chest muscles.

3.) Grasp this position for a count then gently return back to the beginning position.

4.) Repeat for as many reps and sets as you want.

Tips :

1.) Maintain your shoulders and lower back against the bench at all times during this exercise.

2.) Refrain from moving the handles back on the machine.

Bench Press Alternatives to Build Size and Strength.

The bench press is one of the best notable exercises for developing a killer chest — aka the bench is probably one of the most notable pieces of equipment at your gym.

No need to fret! If you can’t seem to get on a bench, or if you don’t have permission to a barbell and plates, there are plenty of other exercises to try that will give many of the same benefits.

Below, we’ve curated 12 bench press alternatives to build your pectoral muscles.

Things to Consider:

With each exercise, you’ll want to finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

This should be quite challenging enough that you can finish the last rep with great form, but you couldn’t complete another.

Ensure that you’re adding weight to incessantly challenge yourself — this is called progressive overload.

Dumbbell Chest Press:

Dumbbells can be easier to find— and handle — than a barbell, especially for a beginner.

Another bonus: The dumbbell chest press targets the same muscles as the bench press: the pectorals, anterior deltoid, and triceps.

How to perform it

1. Lie with your back on a bench and a dumbbell in each hand, relaxing at chest level.

2. Concentrate your palms toward your feet, and make sure that your feet are flat on the floor.

3. Start to extend your arms and push the dumbbells up over your chest. Your arms must be directly over your shoulders at the top.

4. Once your arms are focused, pause and release the weights back down to shoulder level.

5. You’ll notice an enhanced range of motion with dumbbells than with a barbell. Move back up again.

Requiring no equipment, the pushup can be exemplified anywhere.

But don’t let that fool you — it still concentrates your chest in a big way, plus many other muscles throughout the entire body.

If a standard pushup is too challenging, begin on your knees.

How to do it

1. Assume a high plank placed with your hands slightly wider than your shoulders.

2. Your head should be placed so that you’re looking just ahead, and your body should form a straight line from head to toe.

3. Start to bend your elbows, which should be at a 45-degree angle, and lower down until your chest touches the ground.

4. Ensure you push  back up to start.

Aim for 3 sets of 12 reps. If you’re beginning on your knees, aspire for a set of 20 reps. Once this becomes simple, come up to your feet.

Incline dumbbell press

A variation on a dumbbell chest press, the incline dumbbell press concentrates the upper portion of the pectoral muscle and shoulders more than a standard bench press does.

How It Is Done.

1. Amend your bench so it’s set at a 45-degree angle.

2. Grab a dumbbell in each hand and position your back flat against the bench.

3. Your feet should be flat on the floor.

4. Put  your dumbbells to shoulder level, palms pointed out.

5. Expand your elbows, pushing the dumbbells up overhead.

6. Release the dumbbell, putting them to the sides of your chest, then push back up.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps

Decline Dumbbell Press

Whereas the incline dumbbell press concentrates the upper pecs, the decline dumbbell press focuses the lower pecs.

How It Is Done

1. Amend the bench so it’s at a slight decline.

2. Grab a dumbbell in each hand and lie back on the bench, holding the dumbbells at shoulder level.

3. Expand your elbows, pushing the dumbbells up.

4. Release them, making them come back down to shoulder level, then push them back up again.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

Dumbbell Fly

While the dumbbell fly concentrates the chest, it also recruits the shoulders and upper back in a bigger way.

You won’t be able to go as heavy with a dumbbell fly, so pick light- to moderate-weight dumbbells to begin.

How It Is Done

1. Grab a dumbbell in each hand, and lie with your back flat on the bench.

2. Position your feet flat on the floor.

3. Expand  your arms and bring the dumbbells up over the center of your chest. They must be parallel to your body.

4. Gently begin to drop your arms down to each side, maintaining a slight bend in the elbow.

5. Wait when the dumbbells are at shoulder level.

6. Utilizing your chest muscles, pull the dumbbells back up to center.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

Bench dips

Utilizing just your body weight, bench dips enhance upper body strength.

They focus the triceps, chest, and shoulders — just as a bench press would — plus the lats.

How It Is Done

1. Sit down on a bench, ensure hands next to your thighs.

2. Walk your feet out and expand your legs, lifting your bottom off the bench and grasping there with extended arms.

3. You also have the option here to leave your knees bent if you need extra assistant.

4. Hinging at the elbow, bring your body down as far as you can go, or until your arms hit 90 degrees.

5.  Ensure you you up through your palms back to begin.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

Floor press

A floor press is essentially a bench press on the ground, so it performs the same muscles.

Because you can feel your shoulder and back engagement with your upper body flat across the floor, it’s a very good exercise to protect your shoulders.

How to do it

 1. Lie with your back flat on theground and your legs expanded, grasping a barbell across your chest. Your palms should concentrate out.

2. Push the barbell up by expanding your arms.

3. Pause at the top, then reduce the weight until your arms touch the ground.

4. Explode back up for another actual rep.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

Standing Cable Chest Press

Requiring an extra layer of steadiness by standing, the cable chest press concentrates the same muscles as a bench press and challenges you even further.

How It Is Done

1. Place two cables slightly below chest level. Concentrate away from the machine, and grasp the handles with an overhand grip and bent elbows.

2. Stagger your stance, lean forward, and force the handles out and toward the middle of your chest.

3. Pause here, then leave out the cables until the handles are at chest level.

4. Then push it back out.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

Dumbbell pullover

Concentrating the chest in a slightly separate way, the dumbbell pullover also demands the stabilizer muscles and core to work in overdrive.

How It Is Done

Grasping the dumbbell with both hands, place yourself on the ball or bench so that your upper back is supported on the surface.

Your knees should be bent at a 90-degree angle.

Expand your arms over your head so they’re parallel with the ground.

Maintain your arms extended and core engaged, pull the dumbbell up and over your head.

When your arms reach perpendicular to the ground, lower them back to begin.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

Offset Push-Ups

Engaging a pushup with one hand on a lifted surface demands your shoulders, chest, and core to work in a separate way to stabilize your body.

Your Range of Motion is also Enhanced

How It Is Done

Assume a high plank placement with one hand on a step or Bosu ball.

Finish a pushup with your elbows placed at a 45-degree angle, maintaining your body in a straight line from head to heel.

Place your hands up together at the center of the step or ball and over, switching sides.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

Cable Crossover:

Another exercise that concentrates the lower portion of the pecs, the cable crossover demands extra stability and core strength because you’re standing.

How It Is Done

Place two cables at the top rung.

Grasp the handles with an overhand grip and palms centralizing your body. Centralize away from the machine.

Stagger your stance, lean forward, and, with a slight bend in the elbow, start to pull your hands together.

Stop when they touch.

Release the weight, permitting your arms to come up past your shoulders, then pull them in unison again.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

Chest Press Machine

Machines provide more steadiness than free weights, making them an excellent option for beginners.

The chest press machine performs the same muscles as a bench press, too.

How It Is Done

Place on the machine, back flat against the pad.

Grasp the handles with your palms facing out.

Push the weight away from your body, maintaining your feet on the floor.

Once your arms are straight, pause and then return to start.

Finish 3 sets of 12 reps.

The Bottom Line

Mixing things up may give more gains than you think! Challenge your muscles in a separate way, and say goodbye to your days of waiting for a bench press.

Decline and incline bench presses

The decline and incline bench press both centralize one the chest, shoulders, and arms.

However, in an incline bench press, the bench is fixed to 15 to 30 degrees on an incline. Your upper body is actual on an upward slope.

This concentrates your upper pecs instead. It really works the anterior deltoids more than the decline version.

Flat Bench Press

Another bench press alternative that is important is the flat bench press. It’s performed on a bench that’s parallel with the floor. Since your upper body is horizontal, your upper and lower pecs are equally accessible.

The following table shows what muscles are performed most during the different bench press

The Takeaway:

The decline bench press concentrates your lower pectoral muscles. It’s exemplified on a bench that’s set to 15 to 30 degrees on a decline.

For a complete chest workout, perform this exercise with incline and flat bench presses. Doing all three types will assist chisel out your pecs.

To lower your risk for injury, rest your chest and shoulders the day after you do bench presses. Perform a different muscle group instead.

If you’re new to strength training or you’re recovering from an injury, ensure you talk to a personal trainer. They can assist you exemplify decline bench presses safely.

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